Salt lake research weekly: 20_01_2012

I will try to follow here the most interesting papers on salt lake research. The simplest way is to make weekly check of papers on Web of Knowledge.

Out of eight papers indexed this week I will select the paper on the stratified lagoon. Actually the lagoon is meromictic lake – the lake which never or rarely mixed due to salinity gradient.

meromictic lagoon

This lagoon in the North Pacific Ocean has been isolated from the surrounding sea only for 160 years. Pierre Galand from Universityof Pariswith her colleagues studied the microbial communities in different water layers of the lagoon. They found that the bacteria found in the surface layer of the lagoon were mostly related to those found in lakes and estuaries belonging to BetaproteobacteriaAlphaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The presence of typical freshwater species in the lagoon indicates that these microorganisms disperse easily over large distances. The bacterial community in the deep waters isolated from the surface by the salinity gradient was novel. The very short lifetime of the lagoon (c. 160 years) compared with other meromictic systems suggests that microbial novelty is not created by long-term evolutionary processes. Authors propose that microorganisms found in deep anoxic waters containing high concentrations of organic carbon, fuelled by high primary surface production (five to ten times higher than in the surrounding sea), inorganic nitrogen compounds, and iron could be present as rare dormant cells in marine waters and develop when conditions become adequate.

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